THE SENATE

S.B. NO.

2946

TWENTY-EIGHTH LEGISLATURE, 2016

S.D. 2

STATE OF HAWAII

 

 

 

 

 

 

A BILL FOR AN ACT

 

 

RELATING TO INDIGENOUS HAWAIIAN ARCHITECTURE.

 

 

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF HAWAII:

 


SECTION 1. The legislature finds that indigenous Hawaiian architecture is significant to Hawaiian history and culture. Quoting the nineteenth century Hawaiian historian David Malo, "[t]hree things were important for the well-being of the kanaka maoli: The canoe for travel, fishing and warfare, the aina for planting taro, and the hale that provided the place to rest." As a society, there is much to learn from the Hawaiian people and the wisdom of how they lived.

The legislature further finds that indigenous architecture continued to be built and used well into the nineteenth century, decades after Western contact. In 1998, the Maui county council established codes permitting indigenous architecture to be built using ancient techniques with the help of modern tools and materials, including mortar, synthetic cord for the lashing, and chainsaws to cut the logs. Indigenous architecture in Maui is not permitted to have electricity or generators, and the codes require the installation of automatic fire sprinklers and smoke detectors, unless the building is located at least one hundred feet from any other existing structure. The charm and construction of indigenous Hawaiian architecture reinforces the openness and friendly spirit of Hawaii's people.

The legislature also finds that Act 222, Session Laws of Hawaii 2007, required each county to adopt ordinances "allowing the exercise of indigenous native Hawaiian architectural practices, styles, customs, techniques, and materials historically employed by native Hawaiians, in the county's building code, including but not limited to residential and other structures . . . no later than March 31, 2008." The legislature further finds that despite this requirement, there has been little progress in the application of native Hawaiian architectural practices for residential use.

The purpose of this Act is to authorize indigenous native Hawaiian architectural practices on Hawaiian home lands subsistence agricultural lots to be used for agricultural purposes, including subsistence farmer housing.

SECTION 2. The department of Hawaiian home lands shall adopt rules pursuant to chapter 91, Hawaii Revised Statutes, to allow for indigenous native Hawaiian architectural practices on subsistence agricultural lots to be used for agricultural purposes, including for use as farmer housing.

SECTION 3. This Act shall take effect upon its approval.

 



 

Report Title:

Indigenous Hawaiian Architecture; Hawaiian Home Lands; Subsistence Agriculture Lots

 

Description:

Requires the department of Hawaiian home lands to adopt rules to allow for indigenous native Hawaiian architectural practices on subsistence agricultural lots to be used for agricultural purposes, including for use as farmer housing. (SD2)

 

 

 

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