Year: 

10
West Maui, Maalaea, North Kihei
EXPERIENCE
• State House of Representatives (2006 - Present)
• Chair, Economic Revitalization, Business & Military Affairs
• Vice-Chair, Consumer Protection and Commerce
COMMUNITY
• Member, Lahaina Town Action Committee
• Member, Lahaina Restoration Foundation
• Member, Lahaina Rotary Club
• Former Director, West Maui Taxpayer's Association
• Former Member, Lahaina Bypass Now Team


May 6, 2014

Dueling diagnoses

State Rep. Angus McKelvey likes the metaphor: Finding the best fix for the Hawaii Health Connector is like trying to fix an airplane after takeoff. You have to do it very carefully, he said. That is the whole approach to the current version of House Bill 2529, originally a proposal to make the Connector a state agency.

"That's a good analogy," McKelvey said. "It's why we rewrote it It would have been like taking the wings off in flight."

Nobody really expected it to loom so large as an issue this session, McKelvey said. But it's more than likely that a lot of midnight oil will be burned addressing various problems with the Connector the private nonprofit that runs Hawaii's online health insurance exchange, set up under the federal Affordable Care Act.

Before and after its October launch, critics have said the whole thing should have been more open to the public, that there shouldn't be industry officials making decisions who can plainly vote their companies' interest. There are several bills that attempt to make various changes (see story, page E4).

But the biggest headache the thing that could bring the plane crashing down is the lack of funding to keep the agency running. What's worrying everyone is that the nonprofit is subsisting now on more than $204 million in federal grants that expire at year's end; beyond that, sustainability is in doubt. The presumed funding source fees assessed on enrollments in plans sold through the Connector is not penciling out.

Every Tuesday the most current enrollment figures are posted at the site (hawaiihealthconnector.com). Last week's update: Since Oct. 1 there have been 4,297 enrollments in the individual marketplace, and 444 employers applying for small-business coverage plans.

Considering the March 31 enrollment deadline is just over a month away, those aren't good numbers. The original projection had been that the Connector needed to sell 300,000 plans within two years in order to be self-sufficient.

The cost to run the agency in 2015 has been estimated at $15 million, said Steven Tam, director of advocacy for AARP Hawaii, one of the public interest groups involved in discussions about the exchange from the start.

"It appears also and no one has disputed it that they don't have a plan; the revenue to cover it is insufficient," Tam said.

The competing options at this point:

* The House proposal is to bring the nonprofit more closely under state supervision and have an oversight panel decide whether or not taxpayer support is necessary.

* The Senate idea is to leave the nonprofit more independent but assess a sustainability fee from everyone who buys insurance.

Tam isn't sure he likes the idea of subsidies: The state doesn't yet know what it's buying, he said, and should get more information before owning a piece of the Connector.

"Before you do anything, you have to look before you leap," he said. "You're in essence agreeing to buy a house without an inspection."

The person crunching the numbers right now is Tom Matsuda, who took over as acting director of the Connector when the former chief executive, Coral Andrews, resigned last fall.

And the problem, Matsuda said, is that the numbers are likely to keep changing over the coming years, as a series of deadlines set in the ACA take effect. Also, the adjustments in these deadlines made by the Obama administration have changed the calculations as well.

One instance he cited: States currently have the option to define the maximum number of employees a company can have to qualify for tax credits if they buy insurance on the exchange.

"The state last year elected to stick with the current definition, which is 50 employees or less," Matsuda said. "But in 2016, under the ACA federal law, it becomes a mandatory 100 or less.

"That expands the number of employers who potentially could sign up on the exchange," he said. "That's just a simple example of how the upcoming rules really affect enrollment, and therefore it affects sustainability."

Another example: The tax credits themselves are due to expire in 2016.

"It's meant to attract businesses into signing up for ACA plans on the exchange," Matsuda said. "I don't know what the thinking was for the Congress to have it cut off after two years but I think it was to build momentum.

"But from a sustainability standpoint, for us, if that incentive disappears after a couple of years, what is that going to do to enrollment? We don't know."

Lawmakers are asking Matsuda to come up with a financial plan, but he said that all the changes and uncertainty means that it won't be a simple plan but one sketching out different scenarios.

McKelvey, who chairs the House Consumer Protection and Commerce Committee, is working on the issue with state Rep. Della Au Belatti, who chairs the Committee on Health. Belatti said she believes changing the Connector to a state agency would be a difficult but possible transition, and ultimately, that may be the long-term destination for the exchange.

"Hawaii was unique in taking the option to create a nonprofit that, at its inception, was largely independent of state government, Belatti said.

"I think the decision-making at the time was sort of, What could we do, how would it be most expedient, in the sense that there would be flexibility, given the tight timelines, the opportunity to do something innovative?'" she said.

Earlier this session McKelvey heard the assertions by Matsuda and state attorneys that a sudden conversion from private entity to state agency could disrupt federal grants in progress (see chart, page E5). But while Belatti has joined McKelvey on staking out a middle path, she's not entirely convinced it was necessary.

"I don't think it's quite as onerous as some of them are making it out to be," she said. "Because really, the only amounts of money that they have is federal grants. And my understanding is that our federal partners have been made aware of the legislation moving."

That middle path described in the House bill would allow the state to "take a proactive oversight role to monitor the Connector and review its financial and operational plans," while it remains legally a nonprofit.

It was adapted from the approach taken in Colorado, McKelvey said, and would create a legislative oversight panel of 12 members appointed from House and Senate Health, Consumer Protection and Finance committees.The panel would review the sustainability plan for the Connector and determine what kind of fee it could charge.

By contrast, Senate Bill 2471 would simply authorize the levy of a fee on all health and dental insurance plans issued in the state, whether or not it was issued through the Connector.

On one point in particular, the House and Senate are in agreement: The governing board of the Connector would no longer include voting members from the health or dental insurance industry. Among the proposals likely to come before the conference committee later this session is one creating an advisory panel on which industry representatives would sit so that the Connector could have access to their expertise, McKelvey said.

That's a point of satisfaction to the AARP, which had argued vociferously against including health executives as voting members in the first place.

Tam said a public briefing set for this week should help address one of the principal shortcomings of the state's relationship with the Connector: the free flow of information. As a private entity, the exchange has not been subject to state sunshine law, but now, open-meeting requirements are likely to be added.

In any case, Tam said, the public needs to know what they're getting and should insist on something approaching a financial plan before absorbing any of the costs.

"Our main point to the Legislature is to get the due diligence first, find out before you make any decisions," he said. "What do they project at this point in time? What is their best estimate of the revenues they will get in 2015?

"What we're asking for is, give us information."
May 6, 2014

Breweries bill clears conference

A bill that would aid Hawaii small producers of beer, liquor and wine, including Maui Brewing Co. and its expansion in South Maui and possibly Tedeschi Vineyards in Ulupalakua, cleared the state House-Senate conference committee Thursday.

"This measure not only strengthens manufacturing and small business in Hawaii, it also offers our local breweries the opportunity to make different types of beverages that contain our local fruits and fermentables, which in turn supports local agriculture," said West Maui Rep. Angus McKelvey, a sponsor of the bill.

The measure, which still needs to pass the House and the Senate and be signed by the governor, is pivotal to Maui Brewing Co., which is in the process of completing a new brewery in the Maui Research & Technology Park. When the 42,000-square-foot brewery opens in August or September, Maui Brewing Co. will have the ability to produce about 40,000 barrels annually, according to company owner Garrett Marrero.

Work on the Maui Brewing Co. brewery in the Maui Research & Technology Park in Kihei continues Friday. The 42,000-square-foot brewery with tasting room is scheduled to open in August or September, with a brewpub next year.

This will exceed the current limit of 30,000 barrels for brewpub licenses. The company with a brew house in Lahaina and brewpub in Kahana produces more than 22,000 barrels of beer, he said earlier this year.

The measure passed by the conference committee eliminates the barrel limit.

"The concern was if we had not passed this measure it could have been very problematic for his business," said West and South Maui state Sen. Roz Baker, who introduced the bill in the Senate. "We're all about trying to promote local businesses and expanding jobs."

Marrero, who said he operates "the largest craft brewery in the state" and was involved in the drafting of the bill, said that while the measure was not "entirely self-serving . . . it certainly was important" to his company.

Another provision - the addition of a small craft producer pub license - should benefit small wineries, such as Tedeschi, and his brewery, he added.

Marrero said his company has plans to seek the small craft brewery license in the future to diversify his product lines with distilled spirits. While Maui Brewing Co. has no plans to produce wines, the company is interested in ciders and gluten-free alternatives "to showcase our local agriculture market," he said.

He noted that his company's beers use "local agriculture . . . guavas, hibiscuses and the wonderful flora and fauna here to produce unique products."

"We continue to innovate and twist the drinkers' mind" as Maui Brewery produces new lines, such as coconut beer, he said.

The measure also could benefit the Tedeschi winery by increasing the ceiling on production from 10,000 barrels a year to 20,000 barrels, said Baker.

Another issue that Marrero hoped the Legislature would address this session was the tax rates for breweries, which he said are some of the highest in the country.

"It is crippling the growth of craft brewing," he said.

He said that Maui Brewing is a large enough company to be able to budget for the taxes, but it is "hard for small guys starting out. $2.09 (the tax per case of beer) is a pretty big penalty."

Throw in the highest utility and insurance rates in the nation and the costs are pretty daunting for small breweries, he said. Marrero noted that he could produce beer at half the cost on the Mainland and bring it into the islands, like some other beer producers.

"If they want to see the industry grow, they need to see that tax shrink," he said, adding that he plans to push for lower taxes next session.

Efforts to lower spirit taxes were "problematic" this session, said Baker. There was less money to go around with the reduction in estimated revenues for the state during the session, she said. In addition, lawmakers were told that lowering of the taxes "would sweep people in" from the Mainland and not benefit only local breweries.
May 6, 2014

County to receive more TAT revenues

Minutes before the 6 p.m. deadline to file fiscal bills Friday, state lawmakers raised by $20 million over two years the amount of funds counties will share from the transient accommodations, or hotel room, tax, but the $113 million was much less than the counties had sought.

The amended bill that made it out of the state House-Senate conference committee Friday night was not the one Mayor Alan Arakawa and the Maui County Council had lobbied for. Maui County officials, along with their counterparts from the state's other counties, had sought to restore the 44.8 percent of TAT revenues they had received prior to 2010. The state Legislature capped the counties' share of TAT revenues at $93 million that year as the state grappled with difficult economic times.

Maui County receives 22.8 percent of the counties' share of the TAT. The City and County of Honolulu gets 44.1 percent; Hawaii County, 18.6 percent; and Kauai County, 14.5 percent.

The amended version of the bill does not remove the cap, but it does raise it by $10 million each of the next two years, lawmakers said Friday. That means in the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, the cap will be raised to $103 million and in the following fiscal year to $113 million.

"It did pass, but unfortunately not the way we originally wanted it," West Maui Rep. Angus McKelvey said in a phone interview Friday evening. "We were concerned it would die because of the lack of time. Speaker (Joe) Souki forced the bill onto the agenda and got a vote before the close in really, the last few minutes."

"It's a compromise, but at least we'll get something back for the counties," he said.

State Finance Director Kalbert Young has said that if the counties once again received their 44.8 percent cut of the TAT, the state general fund would lose $81 million in the upcoming fiscal year and $98 million the next.

Arakawa told council members in his budget presentation last month that if the cap was lifted, the county could see an additional $17 million in revenue, which would help alleviate the need for his proposed across-the-board property tax hikes.

"If the state removes the cap, there should be no property tax increase," Arakawa said in March. His budget proposal for the upcoming fiscal year includes an approximately 6.5 percent across-the-board increase for all real property classifications.

Council Member Mike White said Friday night that he was "disappointed" that the bill was not passed in its original form.

"It's very disappointing because the state, over the last two years, has collected approximately $250 million more than they would have had the changes not been made to the calculations," White said, adding that the cap was implemented as a temporary measure to help the state with its budget shortfall.

"The impact directly to Maui is that we've received $28 million less than we would have over the last two years," White said.

He said that adding an extra $10 million to the cap would only benefit Maui by about $2.2 million next year, "less than a tenth of what we've lost in the last two years."

"It is the counties that provide water and sewer service; police, fire and ocean safety protection; development and upkeep of most roads; and park development and maintenance - all of which are used to provide visitors with a quality experience," White wrote in a Maui News Viewpoint last month. "The clear majority of visitor needs are filled by the counties, not the state."

White said Friday that he did not know how the bill would affect the council's ongoing budget deliberations, if at all.

At the state Capitol, it was a mad dash to the finish, as House and Senate leaders scrambled to pass bills before the 6 p.m. deadline Friday.

"We had to make some tough cuts, so, in the end, not everybody's happy but that's how it always is," Souki said via phone an hour after the deadline passed.

The Maui Democrat said that one of the biggest issues that arose this session was raising the minimum wage, for which lawmakers agreed to increase from $7.25 to $10.10 per hour over four years.

Bills that made it out of conference committee by Friday will appear before the Legislature for final reading either Tuesday or Thursday, the last day of the session.

A bill that didn't make it out of conference committee would have allowed state public hospitals, including Maui Memorial Medical Center, to enter into a public-private partnership. A similar bill proposed last session also died in conference committee.

"We'll keep working on it," West and South Maui Sen. Roz Baker said. "Sometimes, we let trying to do things perfectly right get in the way of doing something that's serviceable. I kind of think that's what happened with this one."

Baker, who chairs the Senate's Commerce and Consumer Protection Committee and is vice chairwoman of the Health Committee, said that the two chambers just couldn't agree on the final draft of the bill, a common occurrence especially in the final "hectic" hours before the deadline.

Baker said that next session she hopes to start focusing in on some of the problem areas earlier "so we don't end up at the end with people not feeling comfortable as time runs out."

"I don't think the issue with health care at HHSC (Hawaii Health Systems Corp.) and resources, or lack thereof, is going away," Baker said.

HHSC manages and operates Neighbor Island public hospitals, including Maui Memorial, Kula Hospital and Clinic, and Lanai Community Hospital. It also manages and operates three facilities on Oahu.

Overall, Baker, McKelvey and Souki said they were "happy" with the bills that did make it through this session, and optimistic going into the final week of the legislative session.

"There are some disappointments along the way, but I think when the dust settles and we can assess all of the things that we did pass, we got some really good things for Maui and the state," Baker said.

She said that Maui lawmakers were able to secure funds for the pier at Maalaea, the Lahaina bypass and two positions for the boarding program at Lahainaluna High School.

Several Central Maui projects were included in the $12 billion state budget lawmakers advanced Friday.

Lawmakers appropriated $32.5 million for design and construction of a new parking garage at Maui Memorial. They also approved $10 million for the construction of a new access road to Kahului Airport from Hana Highway, and an additional $6 million for other improvements at the airport.

Other Central Maui capital improvement projects include:

* $10 million for the widening of Puunene Avenue from Kamehameha Avenue to Kuihelani Highway that will increase the current two lanes to four lanes.

* $9.7 million for the design and construction of the Central Maui Regional Park and Sports Complex.

* $4 million to Hale Mahaolu for construction of senior affordable rental housing at Kulamalu Town Center subdivision.

* $2.7 million for a new Maui Food Innovation Center at the University of Hawaii Maui College.

* $2.5 million for planning and design for a new middle school in Central Maui.

* $2 million for construction of a new gymnasium at Maui Family YMCA.

* $750,000 for Maui High School for weight training/wrestling rooms and to renovate band/choir building.
March 14, 2014

Lawmakers look to ban ticket scalping

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

Bruno Mars ticket sales have inspired government legislation. Some lawmakers now want to create an anti-scalping law.

Hawaii used to have a scalping law 15 years ago but it was repealed. Now we're one of the few states in the country where scalping is legal.

Bruno Mars is the hottest ticket in town. So much so a pair of seats in the second row are going for $11,000 on StubHub. If prices seems excessive you're not alone. A bill at the State Capitol today would make scalping or reselling a ticket for more than face value against the law.

"I think what we're trying to do is stop this wholesale scalping movement," said Rep. Angus McKelvey, (D) West Maui

State Rep. Angus McKelvey actually introduced the bill before the Bruno Mars tickets skyrocketed and it's getting much more attention now.

"We plan to be very methodical and look to what other states have done since they have worked through a lot of these issues themselves," said Rep. McKelvey.

He says it would help with counterfeiting problems and also wants to outlaw computer bots buying up the tickets.

"We want to use the opportunity of anti scalping to look at the bot phenomenon, especially when you may, not to say that's its happened, have a situation where bots seize up all the tickets simply because the person wants to resell them for scalping purposes," said Rep. McKelvey.

Enforcement is a big question especially for online sales.

"Can they put it into effect in Arizona if someone in Arizona bought a couple of tickets and is selling, scalping them? I don't think it would have an effect. It just wouldn't work," said Tom Moffatt, A Tom Moffatt Production.

Promoter Tom Moffatt's office is all for protecting people but doesn't want lawmakers to rush a flawed law and prevent future blockbusters from coming to town.

The scalping law applies to all events in the State.

The bill was heard at the Capitol today. No vote was taken. Lawmakers plan to work with the parties involved to craft the bill correctly.

The following statement was released by Barbara Saito, with A Tom Moffatt Production: "As longtime promoters in this state, we welcome protections that aid residents in purchasing tickets to shows they wish to see. The resale of tickets far in excess of their face value hurts everyone connected with a promotion except for the scalper, but there are circumstances, particularly charitable fundraising, where such a resale is of benefit to the community. What comes to mind first and foremost is the donation situation surrounding Elvis' "Aloha from Hawaii" concert to benefit the Kui Lee Cancer Fund, which had =no= ticket price but was driven solely by donations...all of which were "in excess" of the face value of the ticket.

A rush to pass any resolution or especially a piece of law without an extensive understanding of the way the industry works -- from the promoters, to the venues, to the primary ticket brokers, to charities, to hotel room sales, to the measures already in place within the industry itself -- could cause more harm than good. A flawed law could potentially cause entertainers to bypass Hawaii altogether, which is not a solution of any kind.

Attempting to push legislation through based on one event, as opposed to looking at a history of events for which scalping has been an issue, puts undue pressure on the one event to prove the merit of the law. Each event is its own set of circumstances and there's not typically a "one size fits all" approach to the scalping issue. So it's a proposed law that needs to do its homework, and we're happy to be a part of that process."


 Measures Introduced in 2019
Measure and Title
HB34 HD1 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO WAGES.
HB54
RELATING TO THE ECONOMY.
HB55
RELATING TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.
HB56
RELATING TO BUSINESS.
HB57
RELATING TO TECHNOLOGY.
HB58
RELATING TO BROADBAND.
HB92
RELATING TO FIDUCIARY ACCESS TO DIGITAL ASSETS.
HB93
RELATING TO DIGITAL MEDIA.
HB131 HD2
RELATING TO HEMP.
HB201 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO INVASIVE SPECIES.
HB232 HD1
RELATING TO MINIMUM WAGE.
HB337 HD1
RELATING TO PUBLIC MEETINGS.
HB338 HD1
RELATING TO THE HAWAII TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION.
HB339 HD1
RELATING TO TAXATION.
HB340 HD1 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO HAWAII TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION.
HB341
RELATING TO SPECIES CONSERVATION.
HB342 HD1
RELATING TO THE HAWAII STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION.
HB343 HD1
RELATING TO A SMALL CRAFT BEER PRODUCER TAX CREDIT.
HB344
RELATING TO PUBLIC ACCESS.
HB345 HD1
RELATING TO THE GENERAL EXCISE TAX.
HB346
RELATING TO COASTAL HIGHWAYS.
HB379 HD1
RELATING TO HEALTH.
HB380
RELATING TO HEALTH.
HB381 HD1
RELATING TO HEALTH.
HB382
RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
HB383 HD1
RELATING TO CHILD WELFARE SERVICES.
HB384
RELATING TO HEALTH.
HB386
RELATING TO SEXUAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION EDUCATION.
HB388 HD1
RELATING TO THE HAWAII ZERO TO THREE COURT.
HB395
RELATING TO THE LEGISLATURE.
HB396
RELATING TO COASTAL EROSION PROACTIVE ADAPTATION PLAN.
HB398 HD1 SD2 CD1
RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII.
HB399
RELATING TO TOURISM.
HB400
RELATING TO TRANSIENT ACCOMMODATIONS HOSTING PLATFORMS.
HB402 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO INCREASING THE OFFICE OF HAWAIIAN AFFAIRS' PRO RATA SHARE OF PUBLIC LAND TRUST FUNDS.
HB434
RELATING TO MARIJUANA.
HB436
RELATING TO CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE RESILIENCY.
HB447
RELATING TO AQUATIC RESOURCES.
HB454 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO KAHOOLAWE ISLAND RESERVE.
HB458 HD1
RELATING TO SMALL BOAT HARBORS.
HB465 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO AGING.
HB466 HD1 SD1
MAKING AN APPROPRIATION FOR THE AGING AND DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER.
HB467 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO THE KUPUNA CAREGIVERS PROGRAM.
HB468 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO THE HEALTHY AGING PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM.
HB469 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO HEARING AIDS.
HB470
RELATING TO RETIREMENT SAVINGS.
HB471 HD1 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO AGING.
HB472
RELATING TO ACTIVE AGING.
HB473
RELATING TO HOMELESSNESS.
HB474
RELATING TO HEALTH.
HB531 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES.
HB532 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO GOVERNMENT DATA.
HB533 HD2 SD1
RELATING TO BROADBAND.
HB535 HD1
RELATING TO THE ISSUANCE OF SPECIAL PURPOSE REVENUE BONDS TO ASSIST PEARL HARBOR FLOATING DRYDOCK, LLC.
HB541
PROPOSING AMENDMENTS TO ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 12 AND 13, OF THE HAWAII CONSTITUTION TO AUTHORIZE THE COUNTIES TO ISSUE TAX INCREMENT BONDS AND TO EXCLUDE TAX INCREMENT BONDS FROM DETERMINATIONS OF THE FUNDED DEBT OF THE COUNTIES.
HB542
RELATING TO TAX INCREMENT BONDS.
HB543 HD1 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING.
HB544
RELATING TO LIABILITY.
HB545
RELATING TO TRANSPORTATION.
HB546 HD2 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO INTOXICATING LIQUOR.
HB547 HD1
RELATING TO FARMS.
HB586 HD1
RELATING TO THE HAWAII HEALTH AUTHORITY.
HB600 HD1
RELATING TO ACTIONS FOR QUIET TITLE.
HB611
PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE HAWAII STATE CONSTITUTION TO LOWER THE QUALIFYING AGE OF VOTERS FOR ANY STATE OR LOCAL ELECTION.
HB612
RELATING TO ABANDONED VEHICLES.
HB613 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT.
HB614 HD1
RELATING TO WAIANAE COAST COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CENTER EMERGENCY ROOM.
HB615 HD3 SD2
RELATING TO THE BOARD OF EDUCATION.
HB616 HD1
RELATING TO TAXATION.
HB635
RELATING TO LEGISLATIVE ACCESS THROUGH REMOTE TESTIMONY.
HB636
RELATING TO RENTALS OF MOPEDS AND MOTOR SCOOTERS.
HB656
RELATING TO CHILD CARE FACILITIES.
HB657
RELATING TO BULLYING.
HB683
RELATING TO SPORTS.
HB706
RELATING TO ELECTRIC VEHICLES.
HB707
RELATING TO CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATIONS.
HB709 HD1 SD1
PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE II OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF HAWAII.
HB710 HD1 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES.
HB711 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO CRIMINAL DEFENSE.
HB712 HD1
RELATING TO ELECTIONS.
HB713 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO HOMELESSNESS.
HB714 HD1
RELATING TO NATURAL DISASTER PROTECTION.
HB715
RELATING TO ELECTIONS.
HB721 HD1
RELATING TO UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII DEVELOPMENTS.
HB725 HD1
RELATING TO STANDARDIZED TESTING.
HB732
RELATING TO TAXATION.
HB765 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO COASTAL PLANNING.
HB766 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO SERVICE IN NON-CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS.
HB767
RELATING TO TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDERS.
HB772
RELATING TO HARBORS.
HB773 HD2 SD2
RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, AND TOURISM.
HB774
RELATING TO THE ALTERNATIVE ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FUND.
HB821 HD2 SD1
RELATING TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS.
HB822
RELATING TO MOTOR VEHICLE INSURANCE.
HB842 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO THE HAWAII STATE PLANNING ACT.
HB844 HD1
RELATING TO TAXATION.
HB846
RELATING TO SISTER-STATE RELATIONSHIPS.
HB849
RELATING TO PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE SHORELINE IN SOUTH MAUI.
HB850 HD1
RELATING TO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION.
HB851
RELATING TO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION.
HB853
RELATING TO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION.
HB887 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO INTOXICATING LIQUOR.
HB888 HD1 SD2 CD2
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS TO THE MAUI HEALTH SYSTEM.
HB889 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS.
HB903 HD1 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO THE JUDICIARY.
HB904
RELATING TO MINORS.
HB917 HD1
RELATING TO PUBLIC SCHOOL LANDS.
HB918 HD1
RELATING TO PUBLIC SCHOOL LANDS.
HB920
RELATING TO SCHOOL BASED HEALTH SERVICES.
HB933
RELATING TO CRISIS INTERVENTION.
HB1084
RELATING TO PUBLIC ACCOUNTANCY.
HB1118
RELATING TO ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY.
HB1119
RELATING TO STATE HOLIDAYS.
HB1132
RELATING TO PUBLIC MEETINGS.
HB1133 HD2 SD2 CD1
RELATING TO MARINE LIFE CONSERVATION DISTRICTS.
HB1134
RELATING TO FORESTRY BUDGET REQUESTS AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS.
HB1146 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO PROCUREMENT.
HB1148
RELATING TO HEALTH CARE COVERAGE.
HB1149
RELATING TO ON-SITE CHILDHOOD FACILITIES.
HB1150
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE VETERANS TREATMENT COURT.
HB1153 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO REMOTE TESTIMONY IN LEGISLATIVE HEARINGS.
HB1166 HD1
RELATING TO CONSUMER PROTECTION.
HB1177 HD1
RELATING TO PUBLIC SAFETY.
HB1189 HD1
RELATING TO RETIREMENT SAVINGS.
HB1200
RELATING TO EMPLOYMENT.
HB1231
RELATING TO INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS.
HB1234 HD1
RELATING TO MOTOR VEHICLES.
HB1271
RELATING TO PUBLIC SAFETY.
HB1274 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO EDUCATION.
HB1275 HD1
RELATING TO EDUCATION.
HB1277 HD1
RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII PROMISE PROGRAM.
HB1280
PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE HAWAII CONSTITUTION, ARTICLE II, SECTION 1, TO EXPAND THE RIGHT TO VOTE.
HB1283
RELATING TO FINANCIAL SECURITY.
HB1284 HD1
RELATING TO PUBLIC HEALTH.
HB1324
RELATING TO MOTOR VEHICLE INSURANCE.
HB1343 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO FAMILY LEAVE.
HB1379
RELATING TO VOTER REGISTRATION.
HB1380 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO CAMPAIGN FINANCE.
HB1381 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO LOBBYISTS.
HB1383 HD2 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO MARIJUANA.
HB1408 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO THE HAWAII HOUSING FINANCE AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION BUDGET.
HB1415 HD1
RELATING TO HEALTH INSURANCE.
HB1416 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO HEALTH.
HB1417 HD1 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO HUMAN SERVICES.
HB1418
RELATING TO UNITED STATES SENATOR DANIEL K. INOUYE DAY.
HB1420 HD2
RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY OPERATING BUDGET.
HB1422 HD2
RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH.
HB1437
MAKING AN APPROPRIATION FOR SCHOOLS IN THE NANAKULI-WAIANAE COMPLEX AREA.
HB1439
RELATING TO WATER CIRCULATION.
HB1440
RELATING TO FORMER PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA.
HB1451 HD3
RELATING TO HOMELESSNESS.
HB1452 HD1
RELATING TO CIVIL LEGAL SERVICES.
HB1453 HD1 SD1 CD2
RELATING TO EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES.
HB1454
RELATING TO AN EARNED INCOME DISREGARD PROGRAM.
HB1455 HD2 SD1 CD1
RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII.
HB1456
RELATING TO THE MAUI FOOD INNOVATION CENTER.
HB1457 HD2 SD1
RELATING TO TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT.
HB1460 HD1
RELATING TO THE STATEWIDE BOATING PROGRAM.
HB1463
RELATING TO DELAY IN PRIOR APPROVAL FOR MEDICAL SERVICES.
HB1465 HD2
RELATING TO PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
HB1466
RELATING TO ELECTIONS.
HB1481 HD1
RELATING TO AGRICULTURAL LOANS.
HB1507 HD1
RELATING TO AGRICULTURE.
HB1530 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO EDUCATION.
HB1536 HD1
RELATING TO EQUAL PAY.
HB1563 HD1 SD2
RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, AND TOURISM.
HB1564 HD1
RELATING TO COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT.
HB1565
RELATING TO CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE TENTH REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT.
HB1566 HD1
RELATING TO PRESCRIPTIVE AUTHORITY FOR CERTAIN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS.
HB1567
RELATING TO HOMELESSNESS.
HB1568
RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII.
HB1569
RELATING TO THE HABITAT CONSERVATION PRESERVE.
HB1573
RELATING TO PROTECTION OF STREAMS.
HB1574 HD2
RELATING TO ELECTRONIC SMOKING PRODUCTS.
HB1579
RELATING TO STATEWIDE SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVES.
HB1580
RELATING TO RANKED CHOICE VOTING.
HB1581
RELATING TO CANNABIS.
HB1592
RELATING TO GENERAL EXCISE TAX EXEMPTIONS.
HB1593 HD1 SD1
RELATING TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.
HB1594
RELATING TO LICENSED CRISIS RESIDENTIAL SHELTERS.
HCR16 HD1
DESIGNATING MARCH AS BLEEDING DISORDERS AWARENESS MONTH.
HCR28 HD1
ENCOURAGING THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND OTHER STAKEHOLDERS TO MEET AS A WORKING GROUP FOR SEXUAL-VIOLENCE PREVENTION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
HCR56 HD1 SD1
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TO ESTABLISH TRAINING PROGRAMS TO EMPOWER PARENTS, TEACHERS, STUDENTS, AND ADMINISTRATORS ON HOW TO PREVENT, IDENTIFY, REPORT, AND MITIGATE ALL FORMS OF CHILD ABUSE THAT MAY TAKE PLACE.
HCR58
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TO DEVELOP A MOBILE APPLICATION FOR REPORTING CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT.
HCR66
REQUESTING THE STATE AND COUNTIES TO EXPAND EFFORTS FOR COMMUNITY INPUT REGARDING ADOPTION OF ADMINISTRATIVE RULES, STATEWIDE PLANS, AND PLANS THAT AFFECT RURAL COMMUNITIES.
HCR72
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES TO EXAMINE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ACT 217, SESSION LAWS OF HAWAII 2018, REGARDING MISREPRESENTATION OF SERVICE ANIMALS.
HCR74
REAFFIRMING THE USE OF THE TERM "DEAF-BLIND" BY THE STATE OF HAWAII AND THE COUNTIES.
HCR75
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TO EXPLORE THE POSSIBILITY OF UPDATING "HAWAI‘I SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND" TO "HAWAI‘I SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF" TO REDUCE CONFUSION AND IDENTIFY WHERE STUDENTS WHO ARE BLIND MAY ACCESS APPROPRIATE RESOURCES AND SERVICES.
HCR79
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, AND TOURISM TO STUDY THE FEASIBILITY OF CREATING AN INDEPENDENT COUNTY ON THE ISLAND OF MOLOKAI.
HCR80 HD1
URGING MAUI COUNTY TO IMMEDIATELY BAN PREDATORY COSMETICS STORES FROM DOING BUSINESS IN LAHAINA.
HCR89
REQUESTING THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS TO ENACT LEGISLATION REMOVING CANNABIS FROM THE FEDERAL CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT AND FACILITATE THE FULL SPECTRUM OF PRIVATE BANKING SERVICES FOR CANNABIS-RELATED BUSINESS.
HCR90
REQUESTING A STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION IN CERTAIN STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
HCR130
REQUESTING THE HAWAII DEVELOPMENT DISABILITIES COUNCIL TO CONVENE A WORKING GROUP TO COORDINATE ALL SERVICES PROVIDED TO INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES.
HCR136
REQUESTING THE AUDITOR TO ASSESS THE PROPOSED REGULATION OF PET BOARDING FACILITIES.
HCR144
CONVENING THE LEGISLATIVE SOCIAL MEDIA TASK FORCE.
HCR156
URGING THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TO PLACE A MORATORIUM ON THE DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, DEPLOYMENT, AND USE OF LETHAL AUTONOMOUS ROBOTICS AND TO ENCOURAGE OTHER NATIONS TO DO THE SAME.
HCR199
REQUESTING THE MEDICAL CANNABIS INSURANCE REIMBURSEMENT WORKING GROUP TO CONTINUE ITS WORK TO ADDRESS THE COMPLEXITIES SURROUNDING MEDICAL CANNABIS REIMBURSEMENTS BY HEALTH INSURANCE.
HCR200
DESIGNATING FEBRUARY OF EACH YEAR AS LIVER AND BILE DUCT CANCER AWARENESS MONTH IN THE STATE OF HAWAII.
HCR201
DESIGNATING APRIL AS ORGAN DONOR AWARENESS MONTH IN HAWAII.
HCR202
DECLARING APRIL AS CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION MONTH.
HCR206
STRONGLY URGING THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS TO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL FEDERAL AID AND SUPPORT TO THE STATE OF HAWAII FOR FINANCIAL, MEDICAL, AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FOR MIGRANTS COVERED BY THE COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION.
HCR208
URGING THE DEPARTMENTS OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TO ADOPT THE CANADIAN DIAGNOSTIC GUIDELINE FOR DIAGNOSIS OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER, AS PUBLISHED IN THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION JOURNAL.
HCR209 HD1
REQUESTING THAT THE HAWAII STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICE ON AGING UPDATE THE 2013 WHITE PAPER ON ACTIVE AGING AND PROVIDE A FINAL REPORT ON ITS UPDATED VERSION NO LATER THAN THE START OF THE REGULAR SESSION OF 2022.
HCR210
REQUESTING THE AUDITOR TO CONDUCT A COMPREHENSIVE PERFORMANCE AND MANAGEMENT AUDIT OF THE CHILD WELFARE SERVICES BRANCH OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES.
HCR211
DECLARING JUNE 27 OF EACH YEAR AS POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS INJURY AWARENESS DAY AND DESIGNATING THE MONTH OF JUNE OF EACH YEAR AS POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS INJURY AWARENESS MONTH IN HAWAII.
HCR212
DECLARING NOVEMBER AS "ALZHEIMER'S AWARENESS MONTH" AND JUNE AS "ALZHEIMER'S AND DEMENTIA AWARENESS MONTH" IN THE STATE OF HAWAII.
HCR232
APPROVING THE SELECTION OF GEORGE RYOICHI ARIYOSHI TO BE INDUCTED INTO THE ALOHA ORDER OF MERIT.
HR17 HD1
DESIGNATING MARCH AS BLEEDING DISORDERS AWARENESS MONTH.
HR20
COMMENDING THE HONPA HONGWANJI MISSION OF HAWAI‘I FOR THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO ADVANCING HAWAIIAN CULTURE.
HR21
HONORING AND CELEBRATING HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF HONOLULU'S CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY AND THE HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB MOVEMENT.
HR33 HD1
ENCOURAGING THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND OTHER STAKEHOLDERS TO MEET AS A WORKING GROUP FOR SEXUAL-VIOLENCE PREVENTION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
HR56
URGING MAUI COUNTY TO TAKE ALL ACTIONS NECESSARY TO INVESTIGATE AND ADDRESS AN INCREASE IN SUSPECTED ILLICIT ACTIVITY IN NORTH KIHEI.
HR57 HD1
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TO ESTABLISH TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR THE PREVENTION, IDENTIFYING AND REPORTING CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT.
HR59
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TO DEVELOP A MOBILE APPLICATION FOR REPORTING CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT.
HR66
REQUESTING THE STATE AND COUNTIES TO EXPAND EFFORTS FOR COMMUNITY INPUT REGARDING ADOPTION OF ADMINISTRATIVE RULES, STATEWIDE PLANS, AND PLANS THAT AFFECT RURAL COMMUNITIES.
HR78 HD1
URGING MAUI COUNTY TO IMMEDIATELY BAN PREDATORY COSMETICS STORES FROM DOING BUSINESS IN LAHAINA.
HR86
REQUESTING THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS TO ENACT LEGISLATION REMOVING CANNABIS FROM THE FEDERAL CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT AND FACILITATE THE FULL SPECTRUM OF PRIVATE BANKING SERVICES FOR CANNABIS-RELATED BUSINESS.
HR87
REQUESTING A STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION IN CERTAIN STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
HR113
URGING THE COUNTY COUNCILS TO ENACT ORDINANCES TO BAN THE SALE AND RENTAL OF FULL-FACE SNORKEL MASKS IN HAWAII.
HR120
REQUESTING THE HAWAII DEVELOPMENT DISABILITIES COUNCIL TO CONVENE A WORKING GROUP TO COORDINATE ALL SERVICES PROVIDED TO INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES AND THEIR FAMILIES.
HR126
REQUESTING THE HAWAII STATE ENERGY OFFICE TO PERFORM A STUDY ON THE FEASIBILITY OF INCENTIVIZING THE CREATION OF A GLASS AND SOLAR PANEL RECYCLING PLANT USING FUNDS FROM A FEE TO BE ATTACHED TO EACH SOLAR PANEL SOLD IN THE STATE.
HR143
URGING THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TO PLACE A MORATORIUM ON THE DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, DEPLOYMENT, AND USE OF LETHAL AUTONOMOUS ROBOTICS AND TO ENCOURAGE OTHER NATIONS TO DO THE SAME.
HR180
DESIGNATING FEBRUARY OF EACH YEAR AS LIVER AND BILE DUCT CANCER AWARENESS MONTH IN THE STATE OF HAWAII.
HR181
DESIGNATING APRIL AS ORGAN DONOR AWARENESS MONTH IN HAWAII.
HR182
DECLARING APRIL AS CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION MONTH.
HR185
STRONGLY URGING THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS TO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL FEDERAL AID AND SUPPORT TO THE STATE OF HAWAII FOR FINANCIAL, MEDICAL, AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FOR MIGRANTS COVERED BY THE COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION.
HR187
URGING THE DEPARTMENTS OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TO ADOPT THE CANADIAN DIAGNOSTIC GUIDELINE FOR DIAGNOSIS OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER, AS PUBLISHED IN THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION JOURNAL.
HR188 HD1
REQUESTING THAT THE HAWAII STATE EXECUTIVE OFFICE ON AGING UPDATE THE 2013 WHITE PAPER ON ACTIVE AGING AND PROVIDE A FINAL REPORT ON ITS UPDATED VERSION NO LATER THAN THE START OF THE REGULAR SESSION OF 2022.
HR189
REQUESTING THE AUDITOR TO CONDUCT A COMPREHENSIVE PERFORMANCE AND MANAGEMENT AUDIT OF THE CHILD WELFARE SERVICES BRANCH OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES.
HR191
DECLARING NOVEMBER AS "ALZHEIMER'S AWARENESS MONTH" AND JUNE AS "ALZHEIMER'S AND DEMENTIA AWARENESS MONTH" IN THE STATE OF HAWAII.
HR217
CONGRATULATING THE WINNERS OF THE HAWAII VENTURE CAPITAL ASSOCIATION'S 19TH ANNUAL AWARDS.