Year: 

Senate District 17
Portion of Mililani, Mililani Mauka, portion of Waipi‘o Acres, Launani Valley, Wahiawā, Whitmore Village
Room: 208
Phone: 808-586-6090
Fax: 808-586-6091
[email protected]
Donovan M. Dela Cruz, is a state senator from District 17, which encompasses portion of Mililani, Mililani Mauka, portion of Waipi‘o Acres, Launani Valley, Wahiawa, and Whitmore Village. Senator Dela Cruz is Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. He also serves on boards or is a member of various organizations nationally and locally such as the National Council of Environmental Legislators and the Leeward Community College Culinary Institute Board just to name a few. Prior to becoming senator, he also served on the Honolulu City Council for eight years, serving as its Chair for three years, being the youngest chair in the history of the Council, at age 30. Senator Dela Cruz is a graduate of Leilehua High School and the University of Oregon where he earned a BA in Journalism and Communication Studies; Masters in Organization Leadership from Argosy University.
Educational Background
•  Leilehua High School - Class of 1991
•  University of Oregon: BA in Journalism, BA in Communications Studies, 1995
•  Argosy University: Masters in Organization Leadership, 2015
•  University of Hawaii - Manoa: Currently working on Doctorate Degree in Architecture

Government Service

Current:

Hawaii State Senate (2010 to Present):
•  Chair, Committee on Ways and Means
•  Member, Committee on Education

Other:
•  Member, Transit Oriented Task Force
•  Member, State Land Use Task Force
•  Board Member, Hawaii Asia Pacific Association (HAPA) Young Leaders
•  Member, National Association of Latino Elected Officials (NALEO)
•  Member, Board of Hispanic Caucus Chairs (BHCC)
•  Member, National Caucus of Environmental Legislators (NCEL)
•  Member, National Conference of State Legislatures Legislative Effectiveness Standing Committee (NCSL)
•  Member, Urban Land Institute (ULI)
•  Member, Clean and Safe Energy Coalition

Past:

Honolulu City Council (2003-2010):
•  Chair, 2003-2007
•  Chair, Committee on Executive Matters
•  Chair, Committee on Public Safety & Services
•  Chair, Committee on Public Health, Safety & Welfare
•  Vice-Chair, Committee on Executive Matters
•  Vice-Chair, Committee on Affordable Housing & Economic Development
•  Vice-Chair, Committee on Transportation & Planning
•  Vice-Chair, Committee on Public Infrastructure

Other:
•  Co-Chair, Board of Hispanic Caucus Chairs Annual Conference in Hawaii, 2013
•  State Commission on National and Community Service - 2010
•  Governor's Working Group on the Purchase of Turtle Bay - 2009
•  Board of Directors, National Association of Counties (NACo) - 2003-2009
•  NACo Annual Conference Advisory Committee - 2005
•  Chair, NACo 2005 Annual Conference and Exposition Steering Committee
•  Secretary, Hawaii State Association of Counties - 2003-2004
•  Chair, Wahiawa Neighborhood Board, 2000-2002

Nominations/Invitations:

•  American Council Professional Fellows Program to Armenia - 2018
•  Hispanic Council for Reform and Educational Options (HCREO) - 2015
•  National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) Gettysburg Leadership - 2015
•  American Council of Young Political Leaders (ACYPL) Exchange Program to Australia - 2013
•  American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Educational Seminar in Israel - 2013
•  Young Elected Officials (YEO) 2013 National Convening, Washington, D. C.
•  Council of State Governments (CSG), Western Legislative Academy for Legislators - 2012
•  Emerging Leaders Program, University of Virginia - 2013
•  Board of Hispanic Caucus Chairs Leadership Workshop, Harvard Kennedy School of Executive Education - 2013

Community Service:

•  Member, Leilehua Alumni and Community Association
•  Member, Hawaii Bicycling League
•  Member, Advisory Council, Leeward Community College
•  Member, Leeward Community College Culinary Institute Board
•  Vice-President (2001-2002), Filipino Chamber of Commerce
•  Member, Wahiawa Lions Club
•  Member, Our Lady of Sorrows Parish

Honors and Awards:

•  HawaiiKidsCAN 2018 Legislative Champion - 2018
•  Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation Inaugural Champion of Agriculture Award - 2013
•  Filipino Community Council of Hawaii Progress Award for Excellence in Government Service, 2007
•  Pacific Century Fellow, 2004
•  Pacific Business News Forty and Under 40 Award, 2001
•  Public Relations Society of America Koa Anvil Award, 2001

Certifications:

•  U.S. Department of Homeland Security - Incident Command System (ICS-402) - 2013

Prior Professions:

•  Director of Marketing, Watermark Publishing
•  Account Supervisor, Stryker Weiner & Yokota Public Relations
•  Account Executive, McNeil Wilson Communications
•  Public Relations Coordinator, Hilton Hawaiian Village
•  Member, DTL Hawaii

Creator/Author:

•  The Whitmore Project - a project to revitalize Central Oahu by re-establishing agricultural dominance in the area resulting in creation of jobs and promoting economic development.
•  Publications: The Okazu Guide, The Puka Guide, The Omiyage Guide - books focusing on such cultural activities as exploring Japanese delicatessens; "hole-in-the-wall" places that locals like to frequent; and places to buy gifts for those who engage in the local tradition of buying gifts when they travel.

Thursday, June 1, 2023

The Real Story Behind the $200M Proviso

https://mailchi.mp/5bcc22ceec4a/the-real-story-behind-the-200m-proviso




Friday, May 26, 2023

Legislature Passes Budget Prioritizing Climate Change, Healthcare and Human Services, and Housing

https://mailchi.mp/22e6cbffb72b/legislature-passes-budget-prioritizing-climate-change-healthcare-and-human-services-and-housing




Tuesday, April 18, 2023

Proposal for new road aims to alleviate traffic headaches in Whitmore Village (Hawaii News Now)

Click here to read the Hawaii News Now article by Jolanie Martinez.




Tuesday, April 18, 2023

Senate Budget Prioritizes Programs and Projects for Mililani and Wahiawa

Click here to read Senator Dela Cruz’s message.




Monday, April 17, 2023

Traffic Woes: Efforts Underway To Create A New Access Point In Whitmore Village (Honolulu Civil Beat)

The Legislature would need to appropriate funding for the project to proceed.

Originally published by Honolulu Civil Beat; click here to read the article on civilbeat.org.

By Alex Melendez | April 14, 2023

Whitmore Avenue in Wahiawa is known for heavy traffic during the after-school rush at Helemano Elementary. The school’s last bell goes off at 2:05 p.m., and Principal Ernest Muh acknowledged that on most days, heavy traffic will persist in the area for hours.

He believes an additional access point would relieve some of the congestion.

“A route that usually takes just a couple of minutes to drive can take an extra 15 minutes, just to get out of the village,” Muh said.

Therefore, a request for a resolution to this recurrent snarl was submitted by Sen. Donovan Dela Cruz, asking the state to create a new access point from Whitmore Village to Kamehameha Highway, via Saipan Road.

Dela Cruz said that funding doesn’t exist for this project yet, so it would first need to be appropriated by the Legislature before the Hawaii Department of Transportation could proceed. But there could be other problems with this idea, too.

“HDOT supports the intent of (the resolution) to create a second access point,” said Shelly Kunishige, the agency’s communications manager. But, she added, Saipan Drive is under federal jurisdiction.

The state therefore would need to coordinate with the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Area Master Station Pacific and the National Security Agency Hawaii, Kunishige said, before a scope for an access point and cost estimate could be created.

Until such collaboration happens, Kunishige said, concrete details about the project, including cost and timeline, cannot be accurately estimated.

Muh said that in Whitmore Village — which has a population of about 4,000, according to the Census Reporter — Saipan Road leads to the National Security Agency building, and their employees are also trying to navigate the traffic.

This new access point therefore would help staff members commute to and from work faster and more efficiently, too.

“I do feel bad for employees at the school,” Muh said. “Traffic is really bad.”




Friday, March 31, 2023

Hawaii Senate Budget Committee Embraces Tax Breaks For Working Families (Honolulu Civil Beat)

Click here to read the Honolulu Civil Beat article by Kevin Dayton.




Friday, March 31, 2023

WAYS AND MEANS VOTES TO APPROVE THE SENATE’S VERSION OF THE STATE BUDGET

Click here to read Senator Dela Cruz’s message.




Monday, March 20, 2023

Wahiawa Product Development Center to open this summer (Pacific Business News)

Click here to read the Pacific Business News article by Katie Helland.




Friday, March 3, 2023

Legislature Reaches First Crossover Deadline

Click here to read Senator Dela Cruz’s message.




Friday, January 27, 2023

Senate Committee on Ways and Means meets with Lieutenant Governor Sylvia Luke on funding for university Pre-K and early learning.

https://mailchi.mp/fef11682aeca/32nd-hawaii-state-legislature-opens-the-2023-legislative-session




Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Leeward Community College Has Big Plans For Training A New Generation Of Food Innovators (Honolulu Civil Beat)

The Wahiawa facility will support the development of new food products for local and export markets.

Originally published by Honolulu Civil Beat; click here to read the article on civilbeat.org.

By Viola Gaskell | December 23, 2022

Leeward Community College is aiming to make its newest facility, the Wahiawa Value-Added Product Development Center, a hub for local food innovation that will embolden young people to try their hand at food entrepreneurship.

LCC is in the early stages of partnering with nearby Leilehua High School and Mililani High School to form a pipeline for students in the schools’ agricultural and culinary tracks.

The 33,327-square-foot facility won’t open until summer, but LCC is starting a program in January designed to help students and entrepreneurs create value-added items like pickles and sauces from local agricultural products, and bring them to market.

The finished facility will house a hyperbaric high-pressure processing machine — the first in the state — which can be used to extend the shelf life of foods, from meat and vegetables to ready-to-eat products.

“All of a sudden you can take the shelf life of a product from three days to three weeks and that becomes more attractive to bring into your chain of 20 stores across the islands,” said program director Chris Bailey.

Originally a Tamura’s warehouse, the rear of the building is edged with loading docks where produce can be received, washed and processed, and where finished products can be packed for shipment or delivery. Signature food-industry white tiles cover swathes of wall-space surrounding industrial stainless steel stoves and hoods in each of the four kitchens. The upper floor of the center will contain meeting spaces where students and entrepreneurs can have business meetings and host events.

The facility is part of a broader plan, spearheaded by Sen. Donovan Dela Cruz, to revitalize Wahiawa. Once a thriving plantation town, Wahiawa fell on hard times after the pineapple industry moved overseas in the 1980s. Today, 43% of Wahiawa residents float just above the poverty line, where they do not qualify for many government assistance programs, but often cannot afford basic necessities, according to the Aloha United Way’s ALICE report.

In the last 10 years, Dela Cruz has procured around $400 million for new developments for the district, including the Whitmore Project, a farming support plan and ag-tech park that helps farmers procure affordable land leases and workforce housing. The state has bought more than 3,000 acres of farmland in the area, previously owned by Dole and the Galbraith Estate, that is now being leased to local farmers.

The overall goal is to increase local food production while creating a host of opportunities for residents.

“Who knows, maybe one day some of these students will be as big as Big Island Candies,” Dela Cruz said.

Aligning Farmers And Students Through Food Innovation

Leilehua already has a robust agriculture program, largely thanks to teacher Jackie Freitas, who grew the program from an initial 67 students to around 200 who now work the fields.

In addition to traditional farming tasks, Leilehua’s ag students build vertical farming towers, experiment with hydroponics and dabble in animal husbandry. Soon they’ll be using farm bots.

Freitas’ students are already making basic value-added products, including mamaki tea, jellies, and chili pepper water, in the certified kitchen on the farm.

Students in the program will be able to partner with local farmers to put less attractive — but perfectly good — produce to use in new agricultural products.

For some farms, less attractive produce known as “number twos” and off-grades, make up 15 to 30% of any given harvest. Demand for these off-grade products has increased due to inflation, but a large portion of them often go to waste or are plowed back into fields.

At Kahuku Farms, a 100-year-old family farm on Oahu’s North Shore, owner Kylie Matsuda already puts off-grades to use at her family’s farm cafe in products like lilikoi balsamic dressing and lilikoi butter and hopes to make make larger batches with extended shelf-life. She’d also be open to new product ideas from students that utilize this grade of produce.

This year, food entrepreneur and local farming advocate Poni Askew, founder of Street Grindz and Cultivate Hawaii, started a three-day value-added camp for middle school students from Wahiawa.

During both camps, in spring and fall, kids spent three days at Leilehua High School — harvesting in the fields with Freitas, prepping in the kitchen with culinary arts teacher Brandon Hanagami — then developing a pitch with the school’s business teacher, Brandon Kon.

At the end of the fall camp, Askew said nearly half of the students wanted to enter the agriculture career pathway when they started high school at Leilehua.

She said that it makes a tremendous amount of sense to have a product development and food manufacturing offering within Hawaii’s college system.

“It’s about how we help to foster success in that world for anybody who wants to do it,” she said.

The Allure Of Ag-Tech

Hawaii’s farmers are aging — about 40% of them are over the age of 65 — and for years, they’ve have had a hard time recruiting young people to work their fields. But some, like Hilo hydroponic farmer Raymond Kawamata, whose entire high-tech operation is indoors, have experienced no such shortage.

LCC Chancellor Carlos Penaloza says that incorporating tech into farming and local food production makes the industry more appealing to Hawaii’s next generation of farm workers.

“The concept of controlling irrigation from an app on your phone is a big deal. Our students are no longer going to see themselves carrying water into the fields, hoping that it’s not a hot day,” he said.

Mililani High School ag teacher Matt Calica has seen a major shift in his students in recent years. Five years ago, the kids who walked into his class were there because they hadn’t picked an elective — now they walk in the door asking what they can do about climate change.

“They hear in the news about how reliant we are on food from the mainland, and they understand how serious this is,” he said.

Although his students want to be involved in changing Hawaii’s reliance on imported food, he points to a broader set of opportunities in agriculture.

“I try to open their eyes to see that agriculture is not just farming. You could get into environmental engineering or marketing, you could be a tractor technician or run IT for a farm — there are different avenues you can take,” Calica said.

Luckily, Calica says that in his class there are still a handful of kids who enjoy nothing more than going into the fields and digging up weeds.


2023 Committee Member of
 2023 Allowance Report
 Measures Introduced in 2023
Measure and Title
SB72 SD2
RELATING TO RENEWABLE ENERGY.
SB117
RELATING TO SPECIAL NUMBER PLATES.
SB121
RELATING TO FIREARMS.
SB124
RELATING TO PROHIBITION OF FIREARMS ON SCHOOL PROPERTY.
SB160
RELATING TO THE USE OF INTOXICANTS WHILE OPERATING A VEHICLE.
SB280
RELATING TO DIRECT INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES TO STUDENTS.
SB281 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO THE COLLEGE SAVINGS PROGRAM.
SB282
RELATING TO THE WORKS OF ART SPECIAL FUND.
SB283
RELATING TO PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL PER-PUPIL FUNDING.
SB284 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.
SB285 SD2 HD2
RELATING TO WASTEWATER SYSTEMS.
SB286
RELATING TO WASTEWATER SYSTEMS.
SB287 SD1 HD1
RELATING TO AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS.
SB288
RELATING TO THE TRANSFER OF THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF THE PACIFIC.
SB289
RELATING TO DIRECT INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES TO STUDENTS.
SB290 SD2
RELATING TO DIRECT INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES TO STUDENTS.
SB291 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO BUDGET-RELATED REPORTS.
SB292 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO BUDGET-RELATED REPORTS.
SB293 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO BUDGET-RELATED REPORTS.
SB294
RELATING TO THE CHILD WELFARE SERVICES.
SB295 SD2 HD2 CD1
RELATING TO THE CHILD WELFARE SERVICES.
SB296 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO SUBMISSION DEADLINES.
SB297 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO GRANTS-IN-AID.
SB298 SD1 HD1
RELATING TO THE HAWAII EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY.
SB299 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO BUDGET-RELATED SUBMISSIONS TO THE LEGISLATURE.
SB300 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO THE EXPENDITURE OF PUBLIC FUNDS FOR LAND IMPROVEMENTS.
SB301
RELATING TO APPROPRIATIONS.
SB302 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO TAXATION.
SB303 SD1 HD1
RELATING TO THE FUNDING OF GRANTS PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 42F, HAWAII REVISED STATUTES.
SB304 SD2 HD3
RELATING TO VISITOR IMPACT FEES.
SB305
RELATING TO CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION.
SB306 SD1 HD1
RELATING TO PUBLIC INFORMATION.
SB307
RELATING TO THE SCHOOL FACILITIES AUTHORITY.
SB308
RELATING TO SEXUAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION EDUCATION.
SB309
RELATING TO HISTORIC PROPERTY.
SB374
RELATING TO SPECIAL LICENSE PLATES FOR IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN WAR VETERANS.
SB386
RELATING TO WASTEWATER SYSTEMS.
SB387
RELATING TO PROCUREMENT.
SB388 HD1
RELATING TO WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES.
SB389 SD1 HD2
RELATING TO EQUITY.
SB390 SD1 HD2 CD1
RELATING TO EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES.
SB391 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII COMMUNITY COLLEGE WORKFORCE TRAINING.
SB392
RELATING TO SUPPORT FOR TRADITIONAL NATIVE SPEAKERS OF HAWAIIAN.
SB393 SD1 HD3
RELATING TO THE LANDLORD-TENANT CODE.
SB394
RELATING TO COLLECTIVE BARGAINING.
SB450
RELATING TO BOARD MEETINGS.
SB510
RELATING TO INFRASTRUCTURE.
SB715
RELATING TO HEALTH.
SB815
RELATING TO THE HAWAII TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION.
SB816
RELATING TO COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION.
SB817 HD1
RELATING TO STATE ENTERPRISE ZONES.
SB818 SD1 HD2
RELATING TO AQUACULTURE.
SB819
RELATING TO ENERGY.
SB820
RELATING TO HISTORIC PRESERVATION.
SB821 SD1 HD2 CD1
RELATING TO FIREWORKS.
SB822 SD2
RELATING TO CREATIVE DISTRICTS.
SB823 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION.
SB824 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO MOORING LINES.
SB825
RELATING TO THE AGRIBUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION.
SB826 SD1
RELATING TO THE SCHOOL FACILITIES AUTHORITY.
SB827
RELATING TO HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE PROGRAMS.
SB828 SD2
RELATING TO THE CERTIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS.
SB829 SD1
RELATING TO BROADBAND.
SB830 SD2 HD1 CD1
RELATING TO EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONSE.
SB831 HD2
RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
SB832 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO EDUCATION.
SB833 SD2 HD3 CD1
RELATING TO THE WAHIAWA IRRIGATION SYSTEM.
SB834
RELATING TO WORKFORCE TRAINING PROGRAMS.
SB835
RELATING TO GENERAL FUND BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII.
SB836
RELATING TO THE AGRIBUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION.
SB837 SD1 HD1
RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, AND TOURISM.
SB838 SD1
RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII COMMUNITY COLLEGES.
SB839 SD2 HD2
RELATING TO RENEWABLE ENERGY.
SB927 SD2
PROPOSING AMENDMENTS TO ARTICLE IV, SECTIONS 4 AND 6, OF THE HAWAII STATE CONSTITUTION REGARDING REAPPORTIONMENT.
SB1021
RELATING TO SPECIAL FUNDS.
SB1022 HD1 CD1
RELATING TO THE EARLY LEARNING BOARD.
SB1023 SD1 HD2
RELATING TO EARLY LEARNING.
SB1096
RELATING TO PERMITS.
SB1102
RELATING TO TRANSIENT ACCOMMODATIONS HOSTING PLATFORMS.
SB1110
RELATING TO CONSUMER DATA PROTECTION.
SB1120 SD2
RELATING TO THE WORKS OF ART SPECIAL FUND.
SB1122 SD1
RELATING TO THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE.
SB1158 SD2
RELATING TO THE EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM.
SB1170
RELATING TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING CREDITS.
SB1171
RELATING TO HOUSING.
SB1196 SD1 HD1
RELATING TO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS.
SB1235 SD2
RELATING TO THE OFFICE OF HAWAIIAN AFFAIRS.
SB1236
RELATING TO COMPOSTING.
SB1237 SD1
RELATING TO THE HAWAII FILM INDUSTRY.
SB1483
RELATING TO PUBLIC SAFETY.
SB1507
RELATING TO FOOD INNOVATION.
SB1520 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO THE HAWAII PACIFIC HYDROGEN HUB.
SB1521 SD2 HD1
RELATING TO SUSTAINABLE LAND USE.
SB1522 SD2 HD2
RELATING TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.
SB1547 SD1 HD1
RELATING TO VALUE-ADDED PRODUCTS.
SB1567 SD2
RELATING TO CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION.
SCR62 SD1
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TO CREATE A SECOND ACCESS POINT FROM WHITMORE VILLAGE VIA SAIPAN DRIVE TO KAMEHAMEHA HIGHWAY TO ALLEVIATE TRAFFIC ON WHITMORE AVENUE.
SCR104 SD1 HD1
URGING HAWAII'S CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION TO RE-INTRODUCE AND SUPPORT THE PASSAGE OF THE HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS PRESERVATION ACT, H.R. RES. 9614, 117TH CONG. (2ND SESS. 2022), TO LOWER THE REQUIRED MINIMUM BLOOD QUANTUM FOR CERTAIN DEPARTMENT OF HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS SUCCESSOR LESSEE BENEFICIARIES FROM ONE-QUARTER NATIVE HAWAIIAN BLOOD TO ONE THIRTY-SECOND.
SCR105
URGING THE OFFICE OF PLANNING AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT TO DEVELOP A FOOD RESILIENCY PLAN FOR STATE OF EMERGENCIES CAUSED BY DISASTERS.
SCR106
URGING THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SERVICES OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF HONOLULU TO CONSTRUCT ELEVATED CROSSWALKS ALONG MEHEULA PARKWAY NEAR MILILANI HIGH SCHOOL.
SCR107
URGING THE CITY AND COUNTY OF HONOLULU'S CRISIS OUTREACH RESPONSE AND ENGAGEMENT PROGRAM TO PROVIDE REGULAR CARE AND SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS IN THE CENTRAL OAHU, NORTH SHORE, LEEWARD, AND WINDWARD REGIONS OF OAHU ON A REGULAR ROTATING SCHEDULE.
SCR109
URGING THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TO DESIGNATE KUNIA, LEILEHUA PLATEAU, AND POAMOHO AS THE CENTRAL OAHU AGRICULTURAL CORRIDOR AND TO ESTABLISH A LIST PRIORITIZING POTENTIAL AGRICULTURAL INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS THAT WOULD PROVIDE THE MOST VALUE TO THE STATE.
SCR110 SD1
URGING THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII WEST OAHU TO ESTABLISH BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY, FOOD SCIENCE, AND EDUCATION.
SCR171
REQUESTING THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII TO TRANSFER THE SCHOOL OF TRAVEL INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII - WEST OAHU.
SCR172 SD1
URGING THE PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING AND GENERAL SERVICES IN COLLABORATION WITH THE STADIUM AUTHORITY TO PROCURE A DEVELOPER TO DESIGN, BUILD, OPERATE, AND MAINTAIN THE NEW ALOHA STADIUM FACILITY.
SR56 SD1
REQUESTING THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TO CREATE A SECOND ACCESS POINT FROM WHITMORE VILLAGE VIA SAIPAN DRIVE TO KAMEHAMEHA HIGHWAY TO ALLEVIATE TRAFFIC ON WHITMORE AVENUE.
SR93 SD1
URGING HAWAII'S CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION TO RE-INTRODUCE AND SUPPORT THE PASSAGE OF THE HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS PRESERVATION ACT, H.R. RES. 9614, 117TH CONG. (2ND SESS. 2022), TO LOWER THE REQUIRED MINIMUM BLOOD QUANTUM FOR CERTAIN DEPARTMENT OF HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS SUCCESSOR LESSEE BENEFICIARIES FROM ONE-QUARTER NATIVE HAWAIIAN BLOOD TO ONE THIRTY-SECOND.
SR94
URGING THE OFFICE OF PLANNING AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT TO DEVELOP A FOOD RESILIENCY PLAN FOR STATE OF EMERGENCIES CAUSED BY DISASTERS.
SR95
URGING THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SERVICES OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF HONOLULU TO CONSTRUCT ELEVATED CROSSWALKS ALONG MEHEULA PARKWAY NEAR MILILANI HIGH SCHOOL.
SR96
URGING THE CITY AND COUNTY OF HONOLULU'S CRISIS OUTREACH RESPONSE AND ENGAGEMENT PROGRAM TO PROVIDE REGULAR CARE AND SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS IN THE CENTRAL OAHU, NORTH SHORE, LEEWARD, AND WINDWARD REGIONS OF OAHU ON A REGULAR ROTATING SCHEDULE.
SR115
URGING THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TO DESIGNATE KUNIA, LEILEHUA PLATEAU, AND POAMOHO AS THE CENTRAL OAHU AGRICULTURAL CORRIDOR AND TO ESTABLISH A LIST PRIORITIZING POTENTIAL AGRICULTURAL INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS THAT WOULD PROVIDE THE MOST VALUE TO THE STATE.
SR116 SD1
URGING THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII WEST OAHU TO ESTABLISH BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY, FOOD SCIENCE, AND EDUCATION.
SR126
REQUESTING THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII TO TRANSFER THE SCHOOL OF TRAVEL INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII - WEST OAHU.
SR127 SD1
URGING THE PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING AND GENERAL SERVICES IN COLLABORATION WITH THE STADIUM AUTHORITY TO PROCURE A DEVELOPER TO DESIGN, BUILD, OPERATE, AND MAINTAIN THE NEW ALOHA STADIUM FACILITY.